52 Weeks of New: Carrots with Ginger and Honey

DSC_0305According to our three girls (and probably our son as well), the words cooked and carrots do not belong together, ever. Any suggestion or mention of a carrot dish to go along with something else has always been met with howls of derision or scorn, or if actually fixed, left on their plates (highly unusual behavior in our house). They really do not like cooked carrots.

And then they had carrots cooked with ginger and honey this past weekend. I did not tell them I was making this, just served them along with our dinner. They ate every bite of the carrots (and everything else). And asked for more.

I picked up this recipe last fall at our neighborhood New Seasons Market when I dropped in for something else; they were fixing it that day as one of their samples and I thought it was delicious and possibly worth a try. I tucked the recipe away and forgot about it, but currently have a huge, 5-pound bag of baby carrots that needs to get used and this recipe came to mind. It used up two pounds of the carrots.

I cut each baby carrot in half, versus leaving them whole, but that was just to speed up the cooking. The picture (once again) is not mine because I once again forgot to take a picture. I really do need to get better about having my camera handy whenever I make something, especially since this is (hopefully) going to be a year-long project.

CARROTS WITH GINGER AND HONEY

  • Coarse salt
  • 6 bunches peeled baby carrots or halved, thin regular carrots (peeled & trimmed), or peeled baby carrots, cut in half (2 pounds)
  • 2 TBSP butter
  • 2 2-inch pieces peeled fresh ginger, cut into matchsticks
  • 3 TBSP honey

Bring a medium saucepan of salted water to boil; add carrots and simmer until almost tender, about 3-4 minutes. Drain well. Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium-high, add the ginger and cook until softened, about 2 minutes. Add the carrots, honey and 1/2 tsp salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until the carrots are glazed, about 4-5 minutes. Serve immediately.

The recipe notes that the carrots can be refrigerated after they are initially boiled, for a day in an airtight container, and then glazed the following day.

Photo Credit: Nature’s Garden Delivered.com

 

 

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7 Comments

Filed under 52 Weeks of New, Recipes

7 responses to “52 Weeks of New: Carrots with Ginger and Honey

  1. Sluggy

    This is one of favorite preparation for carrots. I also do a combo of carrots and parsnips with a ginger glaze. Usually though I roast my carrots if I have other items going into the stove, and then do the glaze.
    This would adapt well to a crock pot method too. And you could avoid losing nutrition by pouring off the water you boil the carrots in, as the crock pot wouldn’t require water or a very small amount that would get absorbed into the ginger honey glaze.
    If you end up with “carrot water”, save it to fortify your chicken stock for other dishes. Just a thought…..

    • The girls love roasted vegetables of any kind . . . except carrots! I’ve done parsnips too, but they were not well-received either. So, it was a nice surprise that they loved these carrots. I think it was the ginger that did it for them.

      How do you fix them in a crockpot? I like the idea of using less water.

  2. Ellie

    you do know baby carrots are not really baby carrots right? they have bleach and other chems on them and just reg carrots shaped to look small.

    • Well, I always buy organic ones, but I know they’ve still been cut, shaped and washed with something. In their favor, they’re easy to put in lunches, get picked for snacks, used as dog treats, etc. and even the huge bags from Costco get used up pretty quickly.

  3. Mmm… looks delicious! I can’t eat ginger… :( I think they’d be good with cinnamon as well!

  4. Tess

    Made these for my family who insist they don’t like “cooked” carrots– they all loved these! I think regular carrots have a LOT more taste than “baby” carrots and they are WAY cheaper, that is what I used. Thank you for the recipe.

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